Toona sinensis

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AndyC
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Toona sinensis

Post by AndyC »

I have a sheltered west facing space in the garden for a tree or large shrub that I had previously prepared for a running bamboo with a root barrier (about 5sq meters).
I've now decided against the bamboo and considering growing Toona sinensis.
I would like it to sucker and produce a grove but unsure of how it would perform in our climate, apparently, it is more likely to produce suckers in warm climates.
If it does produce suckers, is that only likely after many years or can it be encouraged to do so when young?

In my old garden in north Hampshire, I inherited an Ailanthis altissima which was well behaved, handsome, single trunked tree at first but after several years started to produce suckers tens of feet away from the parent tree.
I wonder if Toona sinensis might behave in a similar fashion?
MartinNicklin
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by MartinNicklin »

I've tried T. sinensis Flamingo twice. It didn't get through many winters. It's stunning when it grows well. The normal species may be hardier.
Paul S
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by Paul S »

I grow it here but I imagine my different growing conditions will make a heck of a difference. I'm struggling to remember when I planted it but must be 15 years at least. It has grown slowly and produced just one sucker in that time. But then an Ailanthus nearby has been in the ground much longer, grows faster and sturdier and hasn't suckered at all.

If you want suckers, have you considered a Pterocarya? There are several to choose from and they would suit a wetter climate than here.

Best of all, in my book, is the hard to come by Toxicodendron vernicifluum, used to be a Rhus once upon a time. That does the huge pinnate leaf thing with more poise and elegance, has good autumn colour, too - though I don't think it suckers.
Chad
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by Chad »

I lost Toona sinensis here, and never got the startling spring colour despite having tracked down 'Flamingo'.

The Burncoose site says 'Does best in hot summers' which might explain why it didn't survive, and is perhaps an indication that it isn't a good choice for Cornwall.

Rhus has several good species beyond the suburban [Snob? Me?] R.typhina as well as Paul's suggested [no longer a Rhus] Toxicodendron. John and I both have a R.chinensis, his a tree and mine a spreading shrub; I guess a sign of how windy my site is.

The larger leafed Aralia sucker and form thickets. Except for A. vietnamensis which I haven't persuaded to sucker yet despite stooling it annually. Incidentally, stooling usually encourages suckering.

Chad
AndyC
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by AndyC »

Thanks for the info and suggestions. I shall give the Rhus some consideration.
Chad
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by Chad »

It would be a safe place for a Tetrapanax papyrifer.

Chad
AndyC
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Re: Toona sinensis

Post by AndyC »

Too late Chad, that horse bolted a long time ago.
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